FAQs

If you have any specific questions scroll below to see if we’ve answered it already. Questions range from all our services and within those sections. We’re proud to help in any way you want. Whether it’s answering which way to go with a procedure or simply what this mean. We’re here to help you in any way possible.

What to expect after an extraction?

In most cases, the recovery period lasts only a few days. The following will help speed recovery:

  • If painkillers are needed they will be prescribed by Dr. Rouhanian
  • After 24 hours, rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain. Make your own salt water by mixing 1 tsp (5 g) of salt in a medium-sized glass 8 fl oz  of warm water.
  • Relax after surgery. Physical activity may increase bleeding.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • Eat soft foods, such as gelatin, pudding, or a thin soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as healing progresses.
  • Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
  • Avoid rubbing the area with your tongue.
  • Continue to carefully brush your teeth and tongue.

After the tooth is removed, you may need stitches. Some stitches dissolve over time, and some have to be removed after a few days. Dr. Rouhanian will tell you whether your stitches need to be removed.

How Are Denture Adhesives Applied?


  • Use the minimum amount necessary to provide the maximum benefit. Apply less than you think you need, and then gradually increase the amount until you feel comfortable.
  • Distribute the adhesive evenly on the tissue bearing surface of the denture.
  • Apply or reapply when necessary to provide the desired effect.
  • Always apply the adhesive to a thoroughly clean denture.
  • Remember adhesives work best with a well-fitting denture.

Are Dentures Worn 24 Hours a Day?


Your dentist or prosthodontist will instruct you as to how long to wear dentures and when to remove them. During the first several days after receiving your denture, you may be asked to wear it all the time, including while you sleep. Although this may be temporarily uncomfortable, it is the quickest way to identify the areas on the denture that may need adjustment. Once adjustments are made, you should remove dentures before going to bed. This allows gum tissues to rest and allows normal stimulation and cleansing by the tongue and saliva. The denture can be put back in the mouth in the morning.

Will Dentures Change How I Speak?


After getting dentures, you may have difficulty pronouncing certain words. If so, practice by saying the difficult words out loud. With practice and with time you will become accustomed to speaking properly with dentures.

Will Eating With New Dentures Be Difficult?

Eating with new dentures will take a little practice and may be uncomfortable for some wearers for a few weeks. To get used to the new denture, patients will need to start with soft foods cut into small pieces and chew slowly using both sides of the mouth. As you get used to new dentures, add other foods until you return to a normal diet. You will need to be cautious with hot or hard foods, sharp-edged bones or shells and avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture. Also, don’t use toothpicks while wearing dentures.

Will Dentures Make Me Look Different?


Dentures are made to closely resemble your natural teeth so there should be no noticeable change in appearance. In fact, dentures may even improve your smile and fill out your facial appearance.

What Do New Dentures Feel Like?


New dentures may feel a little odd or loose for a few weeks until the muscles of the cheeks and tongue learn to keep them in place and you get comfortable inserting and removing them. Also, it is not unusual for minor irritation or soreness to occur and for saliva flow to increase when you first start wearing dentures, but these problems will diminish as the mouth adjusts.

Are There Alternatives to Dentures?


Yes, dental implants can be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost is a bit higher, but the implants and implant bridges more closely resemble the feel of real teeth. Dental implants are becoming the alternative to dentures, but not everyone is a candidate for implants.a

Does My Dental Insurance Cover Root Canals?


Most insurance plans pay for root canal treatments as it is typically within the realm of dental coverage. This oftentimes makes root canals an affordable procedure for those who need to remove the pain and discomfort.

What Should One Expect After the Root Canal?


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For the first few days following the completion of a root canal, the tooth may feel sensitive due to natural tissue inflammation, especially if there was pain or infection before the procedure. This sensitivity or discomfort usually can be controlled with over-the-counter pain medications such as Advil, Motrin, Aleve. Most patients can return to their normal activities the next day.

Until your root canal procedure is completely finished — that is to say, the permanent filling is in place and/or the crown, it’s wise to minimize chewing on the tooth under repair. This step will help avoid recontamination of the interior of the tooth and also may prevent a fragile tooth from breaking before the tooth can be fully restored.

Saving your natural teeth is the very best option, if possible. Your natural teeth allow you to eat a wide variety of foods necessary to maintain proper nutrition. In this regard, the root canal procedure is the treatment of choice.

The only alternative to a root canal procedure is having the tooth extracted and replaced with a bridge, implant, or removable partial denture to restore chewing function and prevent adjacent teeth from shifting.

How Painful Is a Root Canal?


Root canal procedures have the reputation of being painful, but in reality most people report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a filling placed.

What Are the Signs That a Root Canal Is Needed?


Sometimes no symptoms are present; however, signs you may need a root canal include:

  • Severe toothache pain upon chewing or application of pressure
  • Prolonged sensitivity/pain to heat or cold temperatures (after the hot or cold has been removed)
  • Discoloration (a darkening) of the tooth
  • Swelling and tenderness in the nearby gums
  • A persistent or recurring pimple on the gums

What Damages a Tooth’s Nerve and Pulp in the First Place?


A tooth’s nerve and pulp can become irritated, inflamed, and infected due to deep decay, repeated dental procedures on a tooth, and/or large fillings, a crack or chip in the tooth, or trauma to the face.

Why Does Tooth Pulp Need to Be Removed?

When a tooth’s nerve tissue or pulp is damaged, it breaks down and bacteria begin to multiply within the pulp chamber. The bacteria and other decayed debris can cause an infection or abscessed tooth. An abscess is a pus-filled pocket that forms at the end of the roots of the tooth. An abscess occurs when the infection spreads all the way past the ends of the roots of the tooth. In addition to an abscess, an infection in the root canal of a tooth can cause:

  • Swelling that may spread to other areas of the face, neck, or head
  • Bone loss around the tip of the root
  • Drainage problems extending outward from the root. A hole can occur through the side of the tooth with drainage into the gums or through the cheek with drainage into the skin.

What is a Root Canal?

A root canal is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed or becomes infected. During a root canal procedure, the nerve and pulp are removed and the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed. Without treatment, the tissue surrounding the tooth will become infected and abscesses may form.

Does a Crowned Tooth Require Special Care?


While a crowned tooth or bridge does not require any special care, remember that simply because a tooth is crowned does not mean the underlying tooth is protected from decay or gum disease. Therefore, continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing once a day especially around the crown area where the gum meets the tooth. Antibacterial mouth rinse can also help.

How Long Do Dental Crowns & Bridges Last?


On average, dental crowns and bridges last around 10 years. The life span of a crown can be much longer and depends on the amount of “wear and tear” the crown is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits. You should avoid such habits as grinding or clenching your teeth, chewing ice, biting fingernails, and using your teeth to open packaging.

How Many Appointments will it take?

Preparing a tooth for a crown or bridge usually requires two visits to Quince Orchard Dental Care. The first step involves examining and preparing the tooth while the second visit involves placement of the permanent crown. Temporary crowns are fabricated at our office and are a temporary restoration until the permanent crown is constructed by a lab.

What Types of Crowns Are Available?

Permanent crowns and bridges can be made by all metal (such as gold or another alloy), porcelain-fused-to-metal, Zirconia, or all ceramic.

 

What Are the Benefits of Dental Bridges?

  • Restore your smile
  • Restore the ability to properly chew and speak
  • Maintain the shape of your face
  • Distribute the forces in your bite properly by replacing missing teeth
    • Prevent remaining teeth from drifting out of position

 

Does insurance cover the cost of Veneers?

The cost of veneers is not generally covered by insurance. To be certain, check with our friendly staff at Quince Orchard Dental Care.

Do Dental Veneers Require Special Care?

Dental veneers do not require any special care. Continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing and flossing as you normally would.

Even though porcelain veneers resist stains, your dentist may recommend that you avoid stain-causing foods and beverages (for example, coffee, tea, or red wine).

How Long Do Dental Veneers Last?

Veneers on average last between 5 and 10 years. How long your Veneer lasts directly correlates with your home care and how well you take care of your veneers. There are patients that have veneers that are older than 10 years and they still look great.

What Are the Advantages of Dental Veneers?

  • They provide a natural tooth appearance.
  • Gum tissue tolerates porcelain well.
  • Porcelain veneers are stain resistant.
  • The color of a porcelain veneer can be selected such that it makes dark teeth appear whiter.

What’s the Procedure for Getting a Dental Veneer?

Getting a dental veneer usually requires three trips to the dentist – one for a consultation, two and three to make and apply the veneers. One tooth or many teeth can simultaneously undergo the veneering process described below.

Diagnosis and treatment planning
This first step involves your active participation. Explain to Dr. Rouhanian and our staff the result that you are trying to achieve. During this appointment, Dr. Rouhanian will examine your teeth to make sure dental veneers are appropriate for you and discuss what the procedure will involve and some of its limitations. He also may take X-rays and possibly make impressions of your mouth and teeth.

Preparation
To prepare a tooth for a veneer, your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface, which is an amount nearly equal to the thickness of the veneer to be added to the tooth surface. Before trimming off the enamel, you and your dentist will decide the need for a local anesthetic to numb the area. If you are a candidate for no prep veneers then there is no need to remove any tooth structure from your teeth. Next, Dr. Rouhanian will take an impression of your tooth. This model is sent out to a dental laboratory, which in turn constructs your veneer. It usually takes 1-2 weeks for your dentist to receive the veneers back from the laboratory. For very unsightly teeth, temporary dental veneers can be placed for an additional cost.

Bonding 
Before the dental veneer is permanently cemented to your tooth, your dentist will temporarily place it on your tooth to examine its fit and color. He or she will repeatedly remove and adjust the veneer as needed to achieve the proper fit; the veneer color can be adjusted with the shade of cement to be used. Next, to prepare your tooth to receive the veneer, your tooth will be cleaned, polished, and etched — which roughens the tooth to allow for a strong bonding process. A special cement is applied to the veneer and the veneer is then placed on your tooth. Once properly position on the tooth, your dentist will apply a special light beam to the dental veneer, which activates chemicals in the cement, causing it to harden or cure very quickly. The final steps involve removing any excess cement, evaluating your bite and making any final adjustments in the veneer as necessary. Dr. Rouhanian may ask you to return for a follow-up visit in a couple of weeks to check how your gums are responding to the presence of your veneer and to once again examine the veneer’s placement.

Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

The problem of teeth grinding is not limited to adults. Approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times — when their baby teeth emerge and when their permanent teeth come in. Most children lose the teeth grinding habit after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.

Most commonly, children grind their teeth during sleep rather than during waking hours. The most common suspected reason for grinding in children is tooth eruption. It is believed that the grinding serves as a soothing mechanism to counteract the pressure of erupting teeth. Other possible causes of pediatric grinding include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworms, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress.

Grinding of the baby teeth rarely results in problems. However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD. Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

 Ask our dentists to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding.

How Do I Find Out if I Grind My Teeth?

Because grinding often occurs during sleep, most people are unaware that they grind their teeth. However, a dull, constant headache or sore jaw is a telltale symptom of bruxism. Many times people learn that they grind their teeth by their loved one who hears the grinding at night.

Why Do People Grind Their Teeth?

Although teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety, it often occurs during sleep and is more likely caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth.

How Is Dry Mouth Treated?

If you think your dry mouth is caused by certain medication you are taking, talk to the doctor who prescribed you the medication. He or she may adjust the dose you are taking or switch you to a different drug that doesn’t cause dry mouth.

An oral rinse to restore mouth moisture may be prescribed. If that doesn’t help a medication that stimulates saliva production may be prescribed.

Other steps you can take that may help improve saliva flow include:

  • Sucking on sugar-free candy or chewing sugar-free gum
  • Drinking plenty of water to help keep your mouth moist
  • Protecting your teeth by brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, and using a fluoride rinse
  • Breathing through your nose, not your mouth, as much as possible
  • Using a room vaporizer to add moisture to the bedroom air
  • Using an over-the-counter artificial saliva substitute

When Is Fluoride Intake Most Critical?

It is certainly important for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years to be exposed to fluoride. This is the timeframe during which the primary and permanent teeth come in. However, adults benefit from fluoride, too.

New research indicates that topical fluoride — from toothpastes, mouth rinses and fluoride treatments — is as important in fighting tooth decay as in strengthening developing teeth.

How Long Do Teeth Whitening Effects Last?

Teeth whitening is not permanent. People who expose their teeth to foods and beverages that cause staining may see the whiteness start to fade in as little as one month. Those who avoid foods and beverages that stain may be able to wait one year or longer before another whitening treatment or touch-up is needed.

The degree of whiteness achieved will vary from individual to individual depending on the condition of the teeth, the level of staining, and the type of bleaching system used.

Does Insurance Cover the Cost of Dental Implants?

In general, dental implants are not covered by dental insurance. Coverage under your medical plan may be possible, depending on the insurance plan and/or cause of tooth loss. Detailed questions about your individual needs and how they relate to insurance should be discussed with our staff and your insurance provider.